Science-based courses have not attracted students because of massive failure - VCs

Discussion about the almost-news events.
Post Reply
fred
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed May 08, 2019 12:39 pm

Science-based courses have not attracted students because of massive failure - VCs

Post by fred » Wed May 08, 2019 12:41 pm

“This year, the [University vice chancellors] VCs say, many agriculture and science-based courses have not attracted students because of the massive failure. Some of the courses have been put on the chopping board, they note.

A shocking 98 per cent of students scored below the C+ pass mark in biology in 2017, with 95 per cent scoring below the pass mark in 2018.

In the 2016 KCSE, a total of 509,822 candidates sat for biology but only 71,348 scored C+ and above. In mathematics, out of 570,278 candidates 63,813 scored C+ and above.

In chemistry, only 47,376 passed out of 566,747 candidates, while out of 149,782 who sat for physics only 50,596 qualified.

In 2017, 545,014 candidates sat for biology but only 1,503 scored C+ and above; in mathematics out 609,495 candidates only 3,926 scored C+ and above; while in chemistry 606,006 candidates sat for the exam but only 54,925 scored C+ and above.

In 2018, in mathematics, out of 653,549 candidates 98,219 scored C+ and above; biology had 584,924 candidates but 33,126 got C+ and above; while in chemistry 650,898 candidates sat for the exam and 73,566 scored C+ and above.”
https://www.nation.co.ke/news/education ... index.html

Is this story really true? I don’t believe it.

- Only 1,503 candidates scored C+ and above in Biology in 2017? yet in 2018 the number is 33,126? Is this possible?

- Consider the case of 2018. Rough estimate, from the results above: More than 30, 000 candidates qualified to study science courses. Are the VCs saying that Kenyan universities used to admit more than 30, 000 students per year to study science related courses?

Is it a case of students not qualifying for the course ie. not scoring C+ & above in Math & Science, or is it a case of students who qualified, not wanting to study those courses (maybe because of poor job prospects)?

If the problem is qualified students’ lack of interest in certain agriculture and science-based courses, then the solution wouldn’t be to lower the admission grades. Solution would be to find ways to tailor the courses to the current market needs.

We need to be very careful here.

There are very many elites in Kenya who are still very bitter that examination cheating in KCSE was eliminated.

The education cabinet secretary then must be congratulated. Unlike before, nowadays it is possible for a student from a small rural school to qualify to study medicine (through regular program).

However, if a student scores a “C” or a “D” in a fair exam, it doesn’t mean they are failures. They can still study for diploma or some other courses. Success is not only attained by going to university.

The most successful person among my classmates in primary school was a “D” student and didn’t go beyond high school.
alleged_mass_failure.jpg

Post Reply